Trinitas Blog

How Do We Accomplish the Goals of Classical Christian Education?

Posted by Ron Gilley on Jan 25, 2021 12:08:18 PM

We are continuing our series intended to remind what the goals of classical Christian education are, why those goals are good for the world, and how we pursue the goals of classical Christian education at Trinitas. I began this series with a metaphor about traveling and the questions one might ask oneself while traveling on a particular journey. Continuing that metaphor, now I set out to answer the question how do we get there? This is a big question, and it will take time to unpack even the merest tip of the iceberg.

Read More

Topics: Blog Posts, School Life, Classical Education, Teaching

Why the Goals of Classical Christian Education are Good for the World

Posted by Ron Gilley on Jan 18, 2021 8:00:51 AM

Last week I set out to produce a series of articles reminding readers what classical Christian education is by describing what its goals are, why those goals should be valued, and what pursuit of those goals looks like at Trinitas Christian School. I used the metaphor of questions one might ask oneself when embarking on a journey. Last week the question I attempted to answer was where are we going? This week the question is why are we going there? My aim is to illustrate why the goals of classical Christian education are good ones for the people of God to pursue.

Read More

Topics: Blog Posts, Christian Education, Christian Living, Social Issues

What is the Goal of Classical Christian Education?

Posted by Ron Gilley on Jan 11, 2021 9:01:22 AM

Periodically on a journey it is good to pause and ask oneself a few questions, even if only briefly and in one’s own mind, to make sure of being on the right track: Where are we going? Why are we going there? How do we plan to get there? Is this the only route or is there a better path? Parents should ask those questions frequently regarding their vision for their children, and most especially regarding the role education plays in the fulfillment of that vision. We've prepared a video that speaks to the heart of this goal. 

Read More

Topics: Blog Posts, Classical Education, Christian Education, True Education

How to Keep the Dog from Eating Your Homework, Conclusion

Posted by Ron Gilley on Jan 4, 2021 8:00:00 AM

(This post is the conclusion of our recent five-part series on homework. Check below for links to each of the proceeding parts.)

Yes, in the end homework is a necessity. It is part of the student’s life if he is to receive a quality education. Teachers, students, and parents can work together, though, to make homework more than something we just bear. Homework is a vehicle to learn time management, self-discipline, and work ethic. But it is also an opportunity for family time and passing down the skills of life from adults to children. I encourage you to do more than merely survive it; rather, embrace it. Homework is as much a part of life as baseball and beach vacations. To think less of it is to amputate from your family some very important time and lessons together. Embrace it and do it well. Both you and your children will be the better for it.

Read More

Topics: Blog Posts, Parenting, Homework

How to Keep the Dog from Eating Your Homework, Part 5

Posted by Ron Gilley on Dec 28, 2020 8:00:00 AM

(This is part five of a five-part series on homework. Here's a link to last week's post about Doing Homework in Community in case you missed it.)

Of all the contentious issues that come up in schools—and believe me, there are a few—homework is the issue that causes the most strife between teachers and students, students and parents, and then parents and teachers. Personally, I am against homework. That position keeps me young and gives me some common ground with students. Still, regardless of my personal feelings on the issue, homework is a necessity in schools that have high academic goals for their students.

Because schools that are committed to providing a good education rely on some homework to help them deliver, it is important for teachers and families to take the homework as seriously as the in-class time. My aim here is to offer a few suggestions for making homework more productive and less contentious; in fact, I hope to help you see it in a whole new light.

Read More

Topics: Blog Posts, Parenting, Homework

How to Keep the Dog from Eating Your Homework, Part 4

Posted by Ron Gilley on Dec 21, 2020 8:00:00 AM

(This is part four of a five-part series on homework. Here's a link to last week's post about Using Homework Time to do Homework in case you missed it.)

Of all the contentious issues that come up in schools—and believe me, there are a few—homework is the issue that causes the most strife between teachers and students, students and parents, and then parents and teachers. Personally, I am against homework. That position keeps me young and gives me some common ground with students. Still, regardless of my personal feelings on the issue, homework is a necessity in schools that have high academic goals for their students.

Because schools that are committed to providing a good education rely on some homework to help them deliver, it is important for teachers and families to take the homework as seriously as the in-class time. My aim here is to offer a few suggestions for making homework more productive and less contentious; in fact, I hope to help you see it in a whole new light.

Read More

Topics: Blog Posts, Parenting, Homework

How to Keep the Dog from Eating Your Homework, Part 3

Posted by Ron Gilley on Dec 14, 2020 8:00:00 AM

(This is part three of a five-part series on homework. Here's a link to last week's post about Settling into a Routine in case you missed it.)

Of all the contentious issues that come up in schools—and believe me, there are a few—homework is the issue that causes the most strife between teachers and students, students and parents, and then parents and teachers. Personally, I am against homework. That position keeps me young and gives me some common ground with students. Still, regardless of my personal feelings on the issue, homework is a necessity in schools that have high academic goals for their students.

Because schools that are committed to providing a good education rely on some homework to help them deliver, it is important for teachers and families to take the homework as seriously as the in-class time. My aim here is to offer a few suggestions for making homework more productive and less contentious; in fact, I hope to help you see it in a whole new light.

Read More

Topics: Blog Posts, Parenting, Homework

How to Keep the Dog from Eating Your Homework, Part 2

Posted by Ron Gilley on Dec 7, 2020 8:00:00 AM

(This is part two of a five-part series on homework. Here's a link to last week's post about Getting the Time Commitment Right in case you missed it.)

Of all the contentious issues that come up in schools—and believe me, there are a few—homework is the issue that causes the most strife between teachers and students, students and parents, and then parents and teachers. Personally, I am against homework. That position keeps me young and gives me some common ground with students. Still, regardless of my personal feelings on the issue, homework is a necessity in schools that have high academic goals for their students.

Because schools that are committed to providing a good education rely on some homework to help them deliver, it is important for teachers and families to take the homework as seriously as the in-class time. My aim here is to offer a few suggestions for making homework more productive and less contentious; in fact, I hope to help you see it in a whole new light.

Read More

Topics: Blog Posts, Parenting, Homework

Get the Trinitas Viewpoint!

Each week we enter what has been called the Great Conversation, writing about issues important to classical education, parenting, and culture from the Trinitas perspective. We invite you to join us as we explore topics as diverse as the smartphone habits of teenagers, kindergarten readiness, and legislation that may affect the future of Christian schools.  

Never miss an update!

Recent Posts